Science

Understanding earthquakes and their hazards

Mission Statement

CRESCENT Science

Subduction zones host the largest earthquakes on the planet. Their cascading consequences — strong shaking, tsunamis, landslides, liquefaction, fire — make them some of the most devastating natural hazards.  As scientists, we strive to understand the important physical processes that drive convergent plate boundaries, like the Cascadia Subduction Zone.  While these lines of inquiry have yielded some of the most important advances in solid Earth geosciences to date, subduction zones are complicated physical systems and understanding their dynamics, past, and future behavior is challenging. CRESCENT’s science program focuses broadly on developing a better understanding of the Cascadia Subduction Zone through focused collaborations between teams of scientists.

Seismometer deployment on Mt. St. Helens (Photo Credit: Alex Iezzi).

Major Activity

Working Groups

CRESCENT’s working groups are teams of scientists, engineers, and educators tasked with developing products that are required to close the gap between science and hazard.  Some working groups will focus on synthesis and integration of existing data into community models that can be used in both basic and applied science applications.  Other working groups will develop tools needed to advance our understanding of subduction zone processes in Cascadia.  Each group meets regularly to ensure timely development of their tools and organizes training, and topical workshops.  Working groups also collaborate to ensure consistency between their products.

DET

Dynamic Rupture, Earthquake Cycle, and Tsunamis

CFM

Community Fault
Model

Scientists work with seizmic equipment

CPAL

Cascadia Paleoseismology

CSSS

Coupling, Seismicity, and Slow Slip

CVM

Community
Velocity Model

Major Activity

Special Interest Groups

Major Activity

Biennial Meetings

Three-day meetings devoted to disseminating and sharing CRESCENT-related science with a combination of keynote talks, short-format talks, poster sessions, and networking opportunities. These meetings will also feature several networking and career-building events for early-career attendees.

Biennial meeting
2019 Modeling Collaboratory for Subduction Workshop (Photo Credit: Gabe Lotto).

Major Activity

Topical Workshops

Ten topical workshops create opportunities for a broad variety of scientists, early career researchers, and graduate students to discuss CRESCENT goals and science challenges. ToWs represent a key forum for the working groups to interact with the community on topics such as data sources, new findings and observations, synthesis methodologies, product dissemination best practices, and other activities. Topical workshops will be organized around talks, free-form discussion, and breakouts and seek the broadest possible representation of academic participants, federal and state agency scientists, and stakeholders. The inclusion of students, postdocs, and early career scientists aligns with CRESCENT’s workforce development goals. Moreover, topical workshops offer a mechanism for identifying priorities for the seed grant program.

2019 Modeling Collaboratory for Subduction Workshop (Photo Credit: Gabe Lotto).

Special Programs

Seed Grants

Who we are

CRESCENT Participants

NSF
National Science Foundation
Oregon State University
Oregon State University
University of Oregon
University of Oregon
USGS
United States Geological Survey
University of North Carolina Wilmington
Central Washington University
Central Washington University
Virginia Tech
Virginia Tech
Portland State University
Portland State University
Purdue University
Purdue University
Cal Poly Humboldt
Cal Poly Humboldt
Western Washington University
Western Washington University
University of California San Diego
University of California at San Diego
Washington State University
Washington State University
University of Washington
University of Washington
SC
Smith College
Stanford University
Stanford University
EarthScope Consortium

Earthscope Consortium
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
OPERA project
2i2c International Interactive Computing Collaboration
2i2c

Cyberinfrastructure

CRESCENT Cloud

CRESCENT cloud is a JupyterHub built for the CRESCENT community to realize its scientific goals.  The hub is maintained and supported through partnerships with the International Interactive Computing Collaboration (2i2c) and the Earthscope Consortium.

Connect with us

Upcoming Events

10/18/2023: Web Site Launch!

Welcome! Welcome to our newly designed web site! Explanations of CRESCENT’s mission, the organizational structure, and planned community activities can…

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Meet The Team

Science Planning Committee

The Science Planning Committee oversees and facilitates CRESCENT’s ambitious scientific goals.  It supports and manages the five center working groups, four special interest groups, cyberinfrastructure, and topical workshops.

Eric Dunham, Stanford University

Eric Dunham
Stanford University
edunham@stanford.edu

Tina Dura, Virginia Tech

Tina Dura
Virginia Tech
tinadura@vt.edu

Amanda Thomas, University of Oregon

Amanda Thomas
University of Oregon
amthomas@uoregon.edu

Pieter-Ewald Share, Oregon State University

Pieter-Ewald Share
Oregon State University
pieter.share@oregonstate.edu

Ashley Streig, Portland State University

Ashley Streig
Portland State University
streig@pdx.edu

Joan Gomberg, USGS

Joan Gomberg
United States Geological Survey
gomberg@usgs.gov

Brendan Crowell, University of Washington

Brendan Crowell
University of Washington
crowellb@uw.edu

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